Ohio

Reflections on APL’s World Premiere Tour of Crime + Punishment
by Artistic Associate Tyler J. Polumsky

 

“I went back to Ohio… But my city was gone…”

 

Entrance to The Balch Street Theatre, home of New World Performance Laboratory (Akron OH) | Photo: Joseph Lavy

Entrance to The Balch Street Theatre, home of New World Performance Laboratory (Akron OH) | Photo: Joseph Lavy

Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders sang that way back in October 1982, on a B side, in lament for her hometown – Akron – and the changes that had turned the serene beauty of her childhood home into something unrecognizable.

Three and a half decades on, I also went [back] to Ohio, but my city was not gone. I went [back] to Ohio, but my family was not gone. No, no. My city was found, my family was there with me, and it just kept growing. For me, nothing was unrecognizable. It was, in fact, as if it was just waiting to be discovered.

There in Akron, you see, just west of downtown, is a little place on Balch Street.* Maybe a little run down. Maybe a little dusty. More than perfect for a theatre company to have as its own home.

A home is a vital thing for making our art. Not to be scoffed at. And this home is far more than most companies I know have.

“Ay… oh… way to go…”

Tyler Polumsky as Raskolnikov in the world premiere of Crime + Punishment | Balch Street Theatre, Akron OH | Photo: Margaretta Campagna

Enter New World Performance Lab.

NWPL is the kind of company you would expect to find in Europe. They are a well-established company. They have been cultivating and culturing their own audience for 25 years. Most of the core ensemble members have been working together for decades. They have their own space. They make art. They do not seem to care much for many of the fancy follies that theatre companies in big metros break themselves on. They have their own terms and direction, and it is Art. They are an intellectual and spiritual pillar of a community. Ten minutes with any of them is enough to make that clear.

Imagine designers who can take a pile of urban waste and turn it into minimalist stagecraft confection. Imagine a board op who prefers to run the light board manually because “The operator needs to be following and working with the actors, live, as a partner, on any given night.” Imagine actors who will let themselves be eaten alive by mosquitos before they will stop their training. The kind of folks who would jump on an actual boat with a pocket full of change, third class, en route to Europe, with dreams of working with Jerzy Grotowski unannounced — not only doing it but going on to become among his closest collaborators.

Imagine leaders who throw the doors open for you so you can premiere your show, who share their wine and guest rooms at home when it’s time to rest, and who put coffee on the next morning so you can get back to it.

 “Ay, oh, way to go…”

So here, naturally, we from Akropolis Performance Lab, tired and road weary, jolly as ever, in this old community hall, in a beautiful and versatile space, surrounded by some excellent brothers and sisters in art, dug right in and premiered our adaptation of Dostoevsky’s Crime + Punishment to an audience hungry for theatre built on sweat, blood, and dynamic creativity rather than popped out of a can.

Tyler J. Polumksy as Raskolnikov | Crime + Punishment (92017-18) | Balch Street Theatre, Akron OH | Photo: Margaretta Campagna

Tyler J. Polumksy as Raskolnikov in the world premiere of Crime + Punishment | Balch Street Theatre, Akron OH | Photo: Margaretta Campagna

in the world premiere of Crime + Punishment

in the world premiere of Crime + Punishment

It went well. How could it have gone otherwise, really, in such an inspired place, among inspired people?

APL and NWPL felt to me like long-lost siblings. This surprised me even though I knew APL’s co-founders were founding members of NWPL before moving to Seattle. The reunion of such things is profound, marked by joy and a mutual curiosity peppered with excitement.

We know ourselves by knowing each other, it seems.

And when you have an audience that has been cultivated, educated, and prepped for all of your experiments — an open audience, hungry for the resonating thought and questions your work will provoke — well, that is when theatre is really ready to happen.

And it did.

“…All my favorite places…”

Shortly before we went, a friend joked to me that going to Ohio to tour a show would be like going to Tashkent, Uzbekistan, where I had spent 10 years with the Ilkholm Theatre. I understood the dig: it’s not New York. Very clever.

“…My city had been pulled down… reduced to parking spaces…”

The thing is, he was right. He just wasn’t right in the way he intended.

“…I was stunned and amazed…”

What I found [back] in Ohio — what I have found in my artistic home with APL and recognized as equally potent in NWPL — is a little thing called inspiration (a little, ilkhom, if you are up on your Uzbek). The main ingredient for true Art. Actual artists who are busy being humans … not people just busy trying to be “Artists.” A space that is begging for a life and roaring back in unexpected places. A theatre that functions as a human institution rather than merely a civic or historical one.

So, yeah — a little like going [back] to Tashkent.

And why shouldn’t a place like this be found in America’s heartland? All roads lead to Ohio. Check a map. Follow any national election. Read the history. Ohio is at the center — “The Heart of It All!” as the state slogan goes.

What a setting! Deep in the heart of the American Beast, at a historically dire and dark time, APL was making some bone-biting theatre. Right there in Ohio.

I went back to Ohio, and my city was right there.

I went back to Ohio, and my family was right there with me, and growing.

And I’ll go back to Ohio, my pretty countryside.

“Ay… Oh… Way to go… OHIO”

* Built in 1929 as Akron’s Jewish Center, this once thriving building was essentially deserted by 1985. Over the next 25 years it changed hands several times but amid the recession and other complications became more and more run down until, in 2011, Akron Beacon Journal columnist Bob Dyer published an article calling it a “wreck.” Shortly thereafter, the City of Akron forged an agreement with New World Performance Lab and the Center for Applied Theatre & Active Culture to take over the theatre portion of the building. Since then, NWPL/CATAC have been cleaning up and caring for the space, pursuing strategic repairs, and fostering a new, vibrant community of artists and audiences.
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Get a Sneak Peek at 730 Steps!

Devising Duklida: Joseph Lavy (R) provides feedback to ensemble members (clockwise from L) Emily Jo Testa, Tyler Polumsky, Matt Sherrill, and Annie Paladino during the devising process.

Devising Duklida: Joseph Lavy (R) provides feedback to ensemble members (clockwise from L) Emily Jo Testa, Tyler Polumsky, Matt Sherrill, and Annie Paladino during the devising process.

Please join us Friday, July 28, for a full rendering of our work-in-progress on 730 Steps.

 

This was the culmination of a year’s work, which began July 23, 2016, with a reading of the initial rehearsal script. As with any new-work, and especially with source material of the scope and complexity of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, the generative phase of our development process has been richly rewarding. We now have a wealth of material to put in front of an audience for feedback.

What is a rendering?

Akropolis uses “rendering” as a particular term of art. On the one had, there is the common sense definition related to performance and the word rendition: representing or depicting something artistically; causing something to be; submitting something for inspection. However, in our work “rendering” always incorporates an older meaning that is less commonly used today: melting something down; extracting parts; or clarifying (as with butter). For APL, a rendering is always an opportunity through performance — whether for an audience of 100 or 1 — to present work for inspection for the express purpose of clarifying it, identifying parts to cut, rearrange, or reshape.

 

The July 28 rendering is an important part of 730 Steps’ development process. The feedback we receive will help us shape the final form of this massive production!

You can expect to see scene work developed to date, in continuous performance. Where there is material still to be devised for major plot points, we will represent that material in a more temporary performance manner. While the finished piece will incorporate music, we will not perform music as part of the rendering. Actors will be in costume. Major props and set pieces will be used, and there will be basic theatrical lighting. Audience will be seated on 3 sides of the action on padded chairs, and there will be risers for optimal viewing.

Plan for a 4 hour viewing. The rendering begins at 7:30 pm. You are welcome to arrive as early as 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be provided.

This one-night event is free and open to the public. However, to comply with the wishes of our donated venue, we ask that you send us an email requesting an invitation. Seating is limited, and invitations will be sent out by email on a first-come, first-served basis.

We hope you will join the ensemble around the table afterwards to talk about your observations!

4Culture Logo
This project is sponsored, in part, by a grant from 4Culture.

Welcome Jennifer Crooks as Porfiry Petrovich

Jennifer CrooksJennifer Crooks is our newest APL Affiliate Artist, joining the 730 Steps cast to take over the role of Porfiry Petrovich!

Jenny has been seen locally with GreenStageReAct Theatre, and Ghost Light Theatricals. She’s also appeared with Chesapeake Shakespeare Company and  Constellation Theatre Company.

We can’t wait to get started on our collaboration!

Costume Designer Fantasia Rose joins 730 Steps Creative Team

Fantasia RoseFantasia Rose has joined the 730 Steps production team as Costume Designer!

Originally from Northern California, Fantasia considers herself a professional dabbler. As a makeup artist/stylist/costume designer, she’s had the opportunity to work on various stage and screen projects including: Scary Mary and the Nightmares Nine (Annex Theatre, 2017), Hold Your Head Up (Maiah Manser, Music Video, 2014), and Growing Pains (Don’t Do It, Web Series, 2016). She also has worked on several productions by The Libertinis.

She holds a BFA in Theater from Cornish College of the Arts – Theater Department.

Welcome, Fantasia!

Kix on Board for 730 Steps Design

Kix joins the 730 Steps creative team as scenic and lighting designer!

An accomplished Ohio-based freelance mixed artist and sculptor, Kix works as set designer and Assistant Technical Director for New World Performance Laboratory & Center for Applied Theatre and Active Culture, which hosted our 2015 Glas Nocturne tour. She was a creative and resourceful partner for us during our run at The Balch Street Theatre — and great fun to be around!

Kix also works as TD of Magical Theatre Company, TD & Production Designer of Ma’Sue Productions and Center for Applied Drama & Autism, carpenter for Neos Dance Theatre, and electrician for many northeast Ohio ballet companies.

You can see a sampling of her visual art and sculpture work via her online portfolio, kixnit.

Welcome aboard, Kix!

Theatre Journal publishes Glas Nocturne Review

Theatre Journal TGN ScreenshotWe are so proud to share this performance review of The Glas Nocturne, which is published in the current issue (68.1) of Theatre Journal!

Thank you to Jeanmarie Higgins and ‪#‎theatrejournal‬ for venturing out to our corner of the country and giving APL’s work critical consideration as part of the international theatre conversation.

From the author: “What started as a quick trip to Seattle to see some friends and some theatre turned into a Theatre Journal performance review of Joseph and Zhenya Lavy’s The Glas Nocturne. I love writing about Akropolis Performance Lab; the work is always virtuosic, irrefutable, and strangely joyful.”

READ THE REVIEW FREE ON ACADEMIA.EDU

An Actor’s Early Thoughts on Ecce Faustus

"But you others, what do I see? You are all sitting there with lusting eyes: you free souls, where is your freedom gone?" | Tyler Polumsky as The Bad Angel | Ecce Faustus (2016) | Photo: Mark Jared Zufelt, Aether Images

“You are all sitting there with lusting eyes: you free souls, where is your freedom gone?” | Tyler Polumsky as The Bad Angel | Ecce Faustus (2016) | Photo: Mark Jared Zufelt, Aether Images

This message was written to Joseph and Zhenya early in the rehearsal process for Ecce Faustus. As APL prepares to remount the piece for video and a special one-night-only showing for audience, it seemed like a good opportunity to share these thoughts.

I am a bit sleepless. Working on text, and stepping through sequences in my mind.

So, I am writing to tell you how genuinely enamored I am with our work.

Ecce Faustus cuts deep. It is a complicated text; based on tried and true classical literature, neither profane nor vulgar in content–though the message is one that strikes straight to the bone of the profanity and vulgarity of the human condition in our time (perhaps throughout all of time).

Sitting and listening/reading the text, observing the shapes of the action, I begin to see what amount of devastating efficacy we can bring to this story.

I know we have a long way to go before these themes begin to sound out and resonate with the intended genuine depth, but I have no doubts that this group of artists will get there.

As I lay my head to sleep, I am grateful for the opportunity to endeavor with you all on something of this calibre and in which I can find a great worldly meaning and value. Faust is a story to be told, again and again, now more than ever.

Indeed we are all Faust: selfish, self absorbed, and self centered. It would almost be a cruel joke were it not disappointingly true….

I have always believed the theatre to be a spiritual endeavor first and foremost. I am glad to not be alone in this and overjoyed at an opportunity to convey a deeply meaningful story to anyone that would hear it–and with a group of artists who are not afraid to delve so deeply for the sake of spiritual wealth.

Thank you,
Tyler

Ken Griffey Jr & the Aesthetics of Function

Ken Griffey Jr - August 27, 2008

Ken Griffey Jr – August 27, 2008

The Kid.

Baseball legend. Seattle’s defining superstar. Generational talent. All of these terms are routinely used to describe Ken Griffey Jr, one of the greatest sports players of the ’90s. For baseball aficionados, watching Griffey play baseball is akin to listening to Montserrat Caballé sing Ave Maria. But why is this so? And more importantly, why should theatre artists care?

Sure, there were the layout game-saving catches. The singles he turned into triples with speed, guile, and vision. The bullet-like, perfectly timed throws from across the field. More than all this, though, it was the swing.

In an era drunk on steroids and raw power, of McGwire and Sosa hitting 60, Griffey was right there, keeping pace alongside them. The fluidity of that bat’s passing through the strike zone could just as easily turn a low and outside two-seamer into a home run as turn a high change-up into a line-drive single. Griffey had a swing that Bobby Valentine (one of the most infamously irascible coaches in history) famously called “perfect” (Stone). Jay Buhner, his teammate with the Mariners, said Griffey would “…call his shots all the friggin’ time. We’d all shake our heads” (Stone).

That swing was magic, more than just effective; it was beautiful.

Kant argues that our judgment of beauty emerging from an object of perception – or in this case an action “ . . . arises on the achievement of a purpose, or at least the recognition of a purposiveness” (Burnham). For Kant, purpose “is the concept according to which it was made” (Burnham). Purposiveness however has an “intrinsic purpose” whereby “a thing embodies its own purpose” (Burnham). There is a particular and mischievous delight in thinking that because the “universality and necessity” of artistic judgments “are in fact a product of features of the human mind” (Burnham), we could just as easily apply our idea of beauty to actions as something like Kant’s sunset or a painting by J.M.W. Turner.

Griffey’s swing didn’t dazzle Bobby Valentine because it was so effective. In fact, I’m sure it would have been the opposite when he coached for the Rangers. Griffey’s swing stood out since there is “pleasure in something because we judge it beautiful, rather than judging it beautiful because we find it pleasurable” (Burnham).

The act of hitting a baseball is a functional movement. It serves a very real world purpose. While this feat can be described as impressive on its own, there are all sorts of examples of other people (Nelson Cruz) hitting balls very far without the action’s being particularly beautiful. So why is Griffey’s swing so beautiful? Bobby Valentine again: “Once you start your swing, people talk about transferring your weight. I always thought his transfer was impeccable, the way he was able to stride, and have a good stride, and yet stop his weight as he was going forward so he could transfer all that weight to his front foot, get off his back foot, and stay balanced as he translated all that energy to the bat” (Stone). All of this boils down to being able to do something extremely well with style, a little bit of “extra” that adds something not essential, yet not extraneous to the basic action. “Griffey got into the box, and it almost looked like he was dancing” (Stone).

I remember going to see Pina Bausch’s final piece of choreography at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2010 entitled “ . . . como el musguito en la piedra, ay si, si, si …” and being dazzled by the dancers’ simply walking around the stage. It was just walking. There wasn’t even a particular aberration of the movement, but it mutated from sensual to unnerving in an instant, yet never deviated from the essential action of needing to carry each individual dancer’s body across the stage. Bausch’s dancers floated with, like Griffey’s swing, “ . . . this dance of balance that performers reveal in fundamental principles common to all scenic forms” (Barba). The shift of balance is not done simply for itself. It is a functional movement—a functional movement that is nevertheless enacted with a certain style and specificity, a little something extra that transforms it from basic action into beautiful action.

Theatre is constantly faced with a tension between establishing something real, while simultaneously establishing something beautiful. In day-to-day existence, people strive to “ . . . follow the principle of minimum effort, that is, obtaining a maximum result with a minimum expenditure of energy” (Barba). In performance, the performer is faced with the particular problem of making actions “ . . . which do not respect the habitual conditionings of the use of the body” (Barba). The audience wants to see something real, as in action that accomplishes something verifiable, and yet is also something that has a little flair. Flair that isn’t added on or layered but that is central to the action. There is a subtle shift of focus by the actor not only from the effective and skilled execution of the action but towards something greater.

Whatever that greater thing is can be left open, maybe even unknown explicitly to person performing the action. Étienne Decroux, the father of corporeal mime, is described as having a “ . . . lion inside him and his technique kept it at bay” (Barba). When we see truly incredible performance on the scale of Griffey’s willfully distributing balls about the field, or Bausch’s dancers gliding across a stage, we see not just the action itself, but what they are pointing towards: the lion in the quote about Decroux.

Such mastery over technique hints at a different aesthetic experience that is called by Kant the Sublime, which “names experiences like violent storms or huge buildings which seem to overwhelm us; that is, we feel we ‘cannot get our head around them’ ” (Burnham). People find these actions awe-inspiring because they relate beyond the actions themselves towards a rational idea that is absolute in some way: “Extra-daily techniques . . . lead to information” (Barba). True expression of genius can be called “beautiful, but in addition is an expression of the state of mind which is generated by an aesthetic idea” (Burnham). Information that gets communicated from functional movement at the scale of Griffey seems to relate less to a quotidian idea and more towards something that has a capital letter in front of it.

For years that bat gliding through the strike zone enraptured millions. But it wasn’t just how good Griffey was at swinging that bat; it was the way that he was good at it that made it so special. The real trick is to be able to do that on stage when the performer only has to pick up a teacup.

Trevor Young Marston was an Akropolis Performance Lab Artistic Associate from 2014 to 2016, appearing in Pomegranate & Ash.

Works Cited

Barba, Eugenio. The Paper Canoe: A Guide to Theatre Anthropology. Trans. Richard Fowler. New York: Routledge, 1995.

Burnham, Douglas. “Immanuel Kant: Aesthetics.” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2016.

Stone, Larry. “For Hall of Fame-bound Ken Griffey Jr., it all started with the swing.” 5.1.2016. Seattle Times.

Eadweard Muybridge. Animal locomotion: an electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of animal movements. 1872-1885 / published under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania. Plates. The plates printed by the Photo-Gravure Company. Philadelphia, 1887 / USC Digital Library, 2010.

Eadweard Muybridge. Animal locomotion: an electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of animal movements. 1872-1885 / published under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania. Plates. The plates printed by the Photo-Gravure Company. Philadelphia, 1887 / USC Digital Library, 2010.

Second Gypsy Nomination for Glas & Joseph Lavy

In addition to Zhenya’s nomination for local composing, Joseph received a Gypsy Rose Lee Award nomination for Best Male Lead Actor in a Play for his role as Dr. Glas in The Glas Nocturne.

The Gypsy Rose Lee Awards are selected by Seattle Theatre Critics. Here is the entire slate of 2015 nominees:

Excellence in Production of a Play (Larger Theaters):

  • Best of Enemies – Taproot Theatre Company
  • Orpheus Descending – Intiman Theatre Festival/The Williams Project
  • Our Town – Strawberry Theatre Workshop
  • Slaughterhouse-Five – Book-It Repertory Theatre
  • The Flick – New Century Theatre Company

Excellence in Production of a Play (Smaller Theaters):

  • Chinglish – ArtsWest
  • Dance Like A Man – Pratidhwani
  • The Secretaries – Theater Schmeater
  • The Tall Girls – Washington Ensemble Theatre
  • Water By The Spoonful – Theatre22

Excellence in Production of a Musical

  • American Idiot – ArtsWest
  • Come From Away – Seattle Repertory Theatre
  • Into the Woods – STAGEright Theatre
  • Lizard Boy – Seattle Repertory Theatre
  • The Great America Trailer Park Musical – STAGEright Theatre

Excellence in Direction of a Play (Larger Theaters):

  • Josh Aaseng – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • David Bennett – Buyer & Cellar (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Malika Oyetimein – Bootycandy (Intiman Theatre Festival)
  • Ryan Purcell – Orpheus Descending (Intiman Theatre Festival/The Williams Project)
  • MJ Sieber – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)

Excellence in Direction of a Play (Smaller Theaters):

  • Julie Beckman – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Desdemona Chiang and Howie Seago – Sound (Azeotrope)
  • John Kazanjian – Mud (New City Theater)
  • Kelly Kitchens – The Art of Bad Men (MAP Theatre)
  • Annie Lareau – Chinglish (ArtsWest)

Excellence in Direction of a Musical

  • Eric Ankrim – American Idiot (ArtsWest)
  • Christopher Ashley – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Matt Giles – Into the Woods (STAGEright Theatre)
  • Brandon Ivie – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Steve Tomkins – No Way to Treat a Lady (Village Theatre)

Excellence in Performance in a Play as a Lead Actor (Male) (Larger Theaters):

  • John Aylward – Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (ACT Theatre)
  • Robert Bergin/Erik Gratton/Todd Jefferson Moore – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • Jeff Berryman – Best of Enemies (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Scott Drummond – Buyer & Cellar (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Tyler Trerise – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)

Excellence in Performance in a Play as a Lead Actor (Male) (Smaller Theaters):

  • Jany Bacallao – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Ryan Higgins – 99 Ways To Fuck A Swan (Washington Ensemble Theatre)
  • Joseph Lavy – The Glas Nocturne (Akropolis Performance Lab)
  • Terry Edward Moore – A Delicate Balance (Theatre9/12)
  • Tyler Trerise – My Mañana Comes (ArtsWest)

Excellence in Performance in a Musical as a Lead Actor (Male)

  • Mark Anders – My Fair Lady (Village Theatre)
  • Nick DeSantis – No Way to Treat a Lady (Village Theatre)
  • Brian Earp – Cabaret (Village Theatre)
  • Frederick Hagreen – American Idiot (ArtsWest)
  • Justin Huertas – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)

Excellence in Performance in a Play as a Lead Actor (Female) (Larger Theaters):

  • Hana Lass – The Explorers Club (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Claudine Mboligikpelani Nako – Little Bee (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • Jeanne Paulsen – Mother Courage And Her Children (Seattle Shakespeare Company)
  • Faith Russell – Best of Enemies (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Amy Thone – Our Town (Strawberry Theatre Workshop)

Excellence in Performance in a Play as a Lead Actor (Female) (Smaller Theaters):

  • Mary Ewald – Mud (New City Theater)
  • Sophia Franzella – My Dear Miss Chancellor (Annex Theatre)
  • Kathy Hsieh – Chinglish (ArtsWest)
  • Yesenia Iglesias – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Anna Kasabyan – Bad Jews (Seattle Public Theater)

Excellence in Performance in a Musical as a Lead Actor (Female)

  • Kristin Burch – Legally Blonde (SecondStory Repertory)
  • Jenn Collela – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Beth DeVries – Snapshots (Village Theatre)
  • EmilyRose Frasca – Are You There, God? It’s Me, Karen Carpenter (STAGEright Theatre)
  • Allison Standley – My Fair Lady (Village Theatre)

Excellence in Performance of a Play as a Supporting Actor (Male) – any non-lead (Larger Theaters):

  • Quinn Franzen – Threesome (ACT Theatre)
  • Sam Hagen – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)
  • Bill Johns – The Explorers Club (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Isaiah Johnson – Bootycandy (Intiman Theatre Festival)
  • Adam Standley – Mr. Burns, a post-electric play (ACT Theatre)

Excellence in Performance of a Play as a Supporting Actor (Male) – any non-lead (Smaller Theaters):

  • Scott Ward Abernethy – Indian Ink (Sound Theatre Company/Pratidhwani)
  • Ben Phillips – Bad Jews (Seattle Public Theater)
  • Brandon Ryan – The Art of Bad Men (MAP Theatre)
  • Ryan Schlect – Sound (Azeotrope)
  • G. Valmont Thomas – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)

Excellence in Performance of a Musical as a Supporting Actor (Male)

  • Rodney Hicks – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Dan Kremer – My Fair Lady (Village Theatre)
  • David Pichette – The Sound of Music (The 5th Avenue Theatre)
  • Caesar Samayoa – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • William A. Williams – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)

Excellence in Performance of a Play as a Supporting Actor (Female) (Larger Theaters):

  • Angel Brice – Bootycandy (Intiman Theatre Festival)
  • Emily Chisholm – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)
  • Rebecca M. Davis – Bootycandy (Intiman Theatre Festival)
  • Jenny Vaughn Hall – Best of Enemies (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Sarah Harlett – The Memorandum (Strawberry Theatre Workshop)

Excellence in Performance of a Play as a Supporting Actor (Female) (Smaller Theaters):

  • Rose Cano – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Cheyenna Clearbrook – Sound (Azeotrope)
  • Ashley Flannegan – The Secretaries (Theater Schmeater)
  • Peggy Gannon – The Art of Bad Men (MAP Theatre)
  • Rhonda J. Soikowski – Wizzer Pizzer (Theatre22)

Excellence in Performance of a Musical as a Supporting Actor (Female) – any non-lead

  • Kirsten deLohr Helland – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Priscilla Hake Lauris – My Fair Lady (Village Theatre)
  • Chelsea LeValley – Angry Housewives (ArtsWest)
  • Q. Smith – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Billie Wildrick – Carousel (The 5th Avenue Theatre)

Excellence in Performance as an Ensemble (Larger Theaters):

  • Bootycandy – Intiman Theatre Festival (Chris Ensweiler, Tyler Trerise, Rebecca M. Davis, Isaiah Johnson, Angel Brice)
  • Come From Away – Seattle Repertory Theatre (Eric Ankrim, Petrina Bromley, Jenn Colella, Joel Hatch, Rodney Hicks,Kendra Kassebaum, Chad Kimball, Lee MacDougall, Caesar Samayoa, Q Smith, Astrid Van Wieren, Sharon Wheatley)
  • Festen – New Century Theatre Company (Emily Chisholm, Bradford Farwell, Ray Gonzalez, Brenda Joyner, Conner Neddersen, Michael Patten, Jason Sanford, Betsy Schwartz, MJ Sieber, Amy Thone, Connor Toms, Evan Whitfield, Peter Dylan O’Connor, Helen Milam)
  • Orpheus Descending – Intiman Theatre Festival/The Williams Project (Grant Chapman, Kemiyondo Coutinho,Rebecca Gibel, Tiffany Nichole Greene, Elise LeBreton, Richard Prioleau, Max Rosenak, Charlie Thurston)
  • No Way to Treat a Lady – Village Theatre (Nick DeSantis, Dane Stokinger, Jessica Skerritt, Bobbi Kotula, Jayne Muirhead)

Excellence in Performance as an Ensemble (Smaller Theaters):

  • Brechtfest – The Horse in Motion (Katherine Bicknell, Nathan Brockett, Liza Curtiss, Amy Escobar,Chris Lee Hill, Harry Todd Jamieson, Sylvia Kowalski, Adria LaMorticella, Kevin Lin, Jocelyn Maher, Nic Morden, Andrew Pritzkau, Hannah Ruwe, Matt Sherrill, Dylan Smith, Shaudi Bianca Vahdat)
  • Dance Like a Man – Pratidhwani (Jay Athalye, Tanvee Kale, Abhijeet Rane, Meenakshi Rishi)
  • The Art of Bad Men – MAP Theatre (Grace Carmack, Peggy Gannon, Ben McFadden, Ben Burris, Brandon Ryan, Sean Schroeder)
  • The Tall Girls – Washington Ensemble Theatre (Leah Salcido Pfenning, Hannah Ruwe, Chelsea Callahan, Adria LaMorticella, Bailie Breaux, Ali Mohamed el-Gasseir)
  • Water By The Spoonful – Theatre22 (Jany Bacallao, Yesenia Iglesias, Rose Cano, G. Valmont Thomas, Keiko Green, Jeff Allen Pierce, Jake Ynzunza)

Excellence in Set Design (Larger Theaters):

  • Andrea Bryn Bush – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)
  • L.B. Morse – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Matthew Smucker – Cabaret (Village Theatre)
  • Matthew Smucker – Our Town (Strawberry Theatre Workshop)
  • Carey Wong – The Comparables (Seattle Repertory Theatre)

Excellence in Set Design (Smaller Theaters):

  • Nina Moser – Mud (New City Theater)
  • Jared Roberts – American Idiot (ArtsWest)
  • Paul Thomas – Dump Site (Seattle Immersive Theatre)
  • Montana Tippett – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Craig Wollam – The Tumbleweed Zephyr (Pork Filled Productions)

Excellence in Costume Design (Larger Theaters):

  • Erik Andor – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Sarah Nash Gates – Carousel (The 5th Avenue Theatre)
  • Kelly McDonald – Bootycandy (Intiman Theatre Festival)
  • Pete Rush – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • Deb Trout – Mr. Burns, a post-electric play (ACT Theatre)

Excellence in Costume Design (Smaller Theaters):

  • Cherelle Ashby & Jonelle Cornwell – Are You There, God? It’s Me, Karen Carpenter (STAGEright Theatre)
  • Candace Frank – Indian Ink (Sound Theatre Company/Pratidhwani)
  • Kelly McDonald – Chinglish (ArtsWest)
  • Nina Moser – Mud (New City Theater)
  • Ali Rose Panzarella – 99 Ways To Fuck A Swan (Washington Ensemble Theatre)

Excellence in Lighting Design (Larger Theaters):

  • Howell Binkley – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Kent Cubbage – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • Geoff Korf – Festen (New Century Theatre Company)
  • Geoff Korf – Mr. Burns, a post-electric play (ACT Theatre)
  • Andrew D. Smith – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)

Excellence in Lighting Design (Smaller Theaters):

  • Tess Malone – The Art of Bad Men (MAP Theatre)
  • Tristan Roberson – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)
  • Gwyn Skone – My Dear Miss Chancellor (Annex Theatre)
  • Lindsay Smith – Mud (New City Theater)
  • Tim Wratten – Tilt Angel (theater simple)

Excellence in Sound Design (Larger Theaters):

  • Dominic CodyKramers – Mr. Burns, a post-electric play (ACT Theatre)
  • Mark Lund – Best of Enemies (Taproot Theatre Company)
  • Evan Mosher and Robertson Witmer – The Flick (New Century Theatre Company)
  • Matt Starritt – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Matt Starritt – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)

Excellence in Sound Design (Smaller Theaters):

  • Dana Amromin – The Secretaries (Theater Schmeater)
  • Christen Audio Group (Andy Somora and Hannah Victoria Franklin) – Is She Dead Yet? (Annex Theatre)
  • Evan Mosher and Andre Nelson – Slowgirl (Seattle Public Theater)
  • Haley Parcher – American Idiot (ArtsWest)
  • Kyle Thompson – Water By The Spoonful (Theatre22)

Excellence in Musical Direction

  • Ian Eisendrath – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Chris Ranney and R.J. Tancioco – American Idiot (ArtsWest)
  • RJ Tancioco – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)

Excellence in Choreography or Movement

  • Donald Byrd – Carousel (The 5th Avenue Theatre)
  • Kelly Devine – Come From Away (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Trina Mills, Shadou Mintrone and Gabe Corey – American Idiot (ArtsWest)

Excellence in Local Playwriting

  • Josh Aaseng – Slaughterhouse-Five (Book-It Repertory Theatre)
  • Caitlin Gilman – My Dear Miss Chancellor (Annex Theatre)
  • Keiko Green – Bunnies (Annex Theatre)
  • Justin Huertas – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Brandon Simmons – Is She Dead Yet? (Annex Theatre)

Excellence in Local Composing

  • Justin Huertas – Lizard Boy (Seattle Repertory Theatre)
  • Zhenya Lavy – The Glas Nocturne (Akropolis Performance Lab)
  • Mark Siano, Opal Peachey, and Dayton Alleman – Bohemia (Marxiano Productions)

Zhenya Lavy Nominated for Gypsy Award

2016_01-07 NOMINATION - Gypsy - Music - ZhenyaFor the second year in a row, Co-Artistic Director Zhenya Lavy has been nominated by the Seattle Theatre Writers for a Gypsy Rose Lee Award in the category of Excellence in Local Composing. The nomination recognizes her work on The Glas Nocturne.

Zhenya’s nomination as one of three for 2015 is an especial honor because, unlike most awards for theatre in the greater Seattle area, the Gypsy Awards do not differentiate separate categories for music at larger- or smaller-budget houses: the potential nominee pool encompasses all original music for theatre activity in the area.

L-R: Joseph Lavy, Linnea Ingalls, Catherine Lavy, Sara Kaus, Annie Paladino, Margaretta Campagna, and Zhenya Lavy | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

The musical landscape Zhenya built for The Glas Nocturne included piano nocturnes by composers from Field and Chopin to Alkan and Bartok (played live by Zhenya), as well as dynamic arrangements of traditional Swedish folk tunes sung in three- and four-part harmonies by the ensemble.

Award winners will be announced later this month.

If you missed The Glas Nocturne, request a spot on our waitlist and be among the first to know when we will remount it in our 2016-17 season.

In the meantime, buy your tickets now for Ecce Faustus, which opens February 5. Ecce Faustus features stunning 5-part madrigals and sacred music by Carlo Gesualdo, with some of the most complex structures and harmonies APL has ever put on stage — all performed live.