730 Steps Premiere Announcement!

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Raskolnikov (Tyler Polumsky) Murders Lizaveta (Annie Paladino) (Rehearsal Photo by Joseph Lavy)

Mark your calendars!
Friends, supporters, and media folks, we are very excited to announce that 730 Steps, (an original adaptation of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment), will have its premiere run of performances
July 14 – 29, 2017!

In a move which we expect will once again defy preconceptions, 730 Steps will be produced in the Isaac Studio Theatre at Taproot Theatre Company, marking the first time since 2004 that APL has produced a full-scale work in a traditional theatre space.
Our work has always been developed with sensitivity to the relationship between the performance art and the specific architecture it inhabits. Over our history, we have developed an approach to creation that we consider “site responsive;” creating work that is at once both very specifically detailed in its performance score, and flexible enough in execution to interact organically with each unique space we perform in.
Over the years, we have produced in a Beacon Hill historical estate house, the Volunteer Park Water Tower, a church sanctuary in Ballard, and the basement of our own home. We have also produced in the On the Boards Studio, CHAC, Freehold and The Chamber Theatres (once upon a time in the Oddfellows Building), and Theatre4 at the Center House Armory.
730 Steps is developing into a very theatrical piece and we’re thrilled to have been invited into Taproot’s beautiful Isaac Studio Theatre to bring it to you!
Wherever we perform, rest assured the artistic principles, vision, and commitment to austerity and intimacy that define our work as uniquely APL will continue to guide us without compromise.
So, mark your calendars!

730 Steps
(based on Crime and Punishment by FM Dostoevsky)
Produced by Akropolis Performance Lab
July 14 – 29, 2017
Isaac Studio Theatre
Taproot Theatre
Greenwood, Seattle WA

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Reviews Are In & Word Is Out About Our Secret Performance

“Poets say the moon is passionate and desirous. Others see an ethical-religious meaning in moonlight. Youth sees the moon as a promise of all those tremendous things which await it; The old find a memento that the promise was never kept, a reminder of all that broke and went to pieces. And what is moonlight?” | Joseph Lavy as Dr. Glas | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

Although we restricted marketing for The Glas Nocturne to social media and word-of-mouth, word has gotten out quite well. So well, in fact, that we are extending our run by a full week beyond our initial expectation!

If you haven’t yet gotten a seat, we have just 30 available between now and June 7.

Check out some of what’s being said about this truly remarkable performance!

Just 30 seats remain through June 7, so act quickly to get your invitation!

REQUEST INVITATION BUTTON

Artistic Projects Premiering in 2015-16

 

In the coming year, you will have more opportunities than ever to see an Akropolis Performance Lab production. We are thrilled to announce our current slate of artistic projects and can’t wait for you to see them!

Check out the fantastic season graphic by Joe Patrick Kane, and read a bit about each of the pieces below.

2015-16 Artistic Projects

Pomegranate & Ash

An experimental work in Theatre of Polyphony, taking TS Eliot’s Ash Wednesday, Monteverdi madrigals, the Hymn of Demeter, traditional Shaker songs and each performer’s personal biography as source material for an original performance rooted in themes of separation, loss, and reunification. Theatre of Polyphony weaves simultaneous lines of independent performance — a cappella song, movement, dance, physical action and spoken text — into a rich, multi-faceted performance event. This piece is an ongoing, ever-evolving project, bridging the two primary domains of APL’s artistic work: public performance and ensemble training. A segment of the work premiered at  On the Boards Open Studio #6 on February 8, 2015. Pomegranate & Ash will be shown in its full form during Spring and Summer 2015.

The Glas Nocturne

APL Co-Artistic Director Joseph Lavy adapts Hjalmar Söderberg’s scandalous fin-de-siecle novel, Doktor Glas, into a noir monodrama of psycho-sexual fixation, moral questioning, and murder. Our most intimate piece to date, The Glas Nocturne will be produced as a speak-easy chamber piece, pushing APL in new directions as we confront the novel’s central question: Is it ever justifiable to take the life of another human being? Conceived for a maximum audience of 10. Performances will begin in May 2015 and will be by invitation only. Information about how to request an invitation is forthcoming.

Ecce Faustus

A contemporary medieval mystery play excavating the archetypal Faustian narrative. Devised from canonical texts, historical figures, and obscure manuscripts. Woven through with sublime vocal music composed by the diabolical Carlo Gesualdo. Rooted in APL’s unique brand of physical theatre. Ecce Faustus presents an examination of madness, virtue, and the physical and spiritual costs of human ambition. Continuing APL’s fifteen-year tradition of long-form creative process, this production marks a return to the ensemble’s signature theatrical landscapes, exemplified by such past pieces as Jeanne, the Maid and Dream of a Ridiculous Man. Featuring Artistic Associate Trevor Young Marston as Dr. Faustus. Premieres Winter 2016.

Announcements about dates, casts, and more to come!

Pomegranate & Ash Makes a Strong Debut

Yesterday we premiered Pomegranate & Ash: An Experiment in Theatre of Polyphony in On the Boards’ Open Studio #6 — and today OTB has confirmed that we are the first group to fully pack the house!

The Sad Days that are Surely to Come

"This is the time of tension between dying and birth -- the place of solitude where three dreams cross." | Henry James Walker, Trevor Young Marston, and Zhenya Lavy | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

Dance of Separation

Dance of Separation | Front: Sara Kaus and Annie Paladino. Back: Linnea Ingalls, Margaretta Campagna, Zhenya Lavy. | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

Dance of Seduction

Dance of Seduction "Oh, ho, I will have it. I will bow and bend to get it." | Trevor Young Marston and Sara Kaus | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

The Abduction of Persephone

The Abduction of Persephone | Annie Paladino with Zhenya Lavy, Catherine Lavy, Margaretta Campagna, Linnea Ingalls, Emily Jo Testa. | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

Clairvoyant Action

Clairvoyant Action | Emily Jo Testa with Henry James Walker, Joseph Lavy, Sara Kaus | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

An Angel Hath Troubled the Water

An Angel Hath Troubled the Water | Trevor Young Marston with Catherine Lavy, Annie Paladino, Margaretta Campagna, Emily Jo Testa | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

An Angel Hath Troubled the Water

An Angel Hath Troubled the Water "These waters will heal you, they will set you free." | Linnea Ingalls & Trevor Young Marston | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

Low, Low

"And the sword I will wield, and the sword I will wield... for this is my work while here below." | (L-R) Back: Joseph Lavy, Trevor Young Marston, Henry James Walker. 3rd Row: Annie Paladino, Emily Jo Testa, Sara Kaus. 2nd row: Margaretta Campagna, Linnea Ingalls. Front: Zhenya Lavy, Catherine Lavy. | Photo: Joe Patrick Kane

 

Here’s a sampling of audience responses:

  • “The ensemble was so tight. Precise and tuned into each other.”
  • “The music was amazing!”
  • “Their dance [Dance of Seduction by Sara Kaus and Trevor Young Marston] was really powerful!”
  • “The girl’s [Catherine Lavy] song made me cry!”
  • “It’s hard to believe you’ve only been working together as an ensemble for three months!”
  • “Very moving. Even though there was no story, the imagery and the way you layered everything together was striking.”
  • “It was refreshing to see a performance that was truly interdisciplinary!”

Were you there? We’d love to get your feedback, too! Please email us or comment below.

Thank you to On the Boards for organizing this event.

Pomegranate & Ash continues to evolve. Look for additional showing announcements through this Spring and Summer.

Pomegranate & Ash to Premiere in OTB’s Open Studio

Pomegranate & Ash | On the Boards Open Studio | Feb. 8, 3:30 PM.

Pomegranate & Ash | On the Boards Open Studio | Feb. 8, 3:30 PM.

The fullest manifestation to date of APL’s Theatre of Polyphony, Pomegranate & Ash premieres at On the Boards in the Open Studio on Sunday, February 8, at 3:30pm.

Pomegranate and Ash takes TS Eliot’s Ash Wednesday, Monteverdi madrigals, the Hymn of Demeter, music from the Shaker tradition, and each performer’s personal biography as source material for an original performance rooted in themes of separation, loss, and reunification.

The entire ensemble performs in this piece, including all our new Artistic Associates and Apprentices.

Admission to Open Studio is by donation only: $5 suggested.

Learn more about Pomegranate & Ash and APL’s Theatre of Polyphony.

Corpus Christi?

In 2002, APL was about to begin rehearsals on an original adaptation of Pinocchio when the US–exploiting the wake of 9/11– opportunistically decided to wage war on Iraq based on dubious evidence of WMDs. We were unanimously and vehemently opposed to the action, and agreed APL needed to respond artistically, so we tabled the Pinocchio project and picked up Jeanne, The Maid.
Our intent was not to make a 1:1 equivalency between Joan of Arc and modern-day jihadists (Although, they are both religious extremists/zealots fighting wars in the name of God). We were driven mainly by the impulse to interrogate and illustrate the capacity of a corrupt religio-political power structure to manufacture evidence in order to support their desired outcomes and, through immoral & coercive means, actualize their predetermined objectives. And to demonstrate the social complicity of the people who sit there and let it happen, or accept that Ends justify Means.
When we finished rehearsals and were ready to open in 2003, alt-media just began to break the stories of American atrocities in Abu Ghraib prison. Most of the country was in denial that the USA would do anything like that, still pumped up on jingoistic nationalism. If it happened at all, it had to be merely by a few rogue actors. America was certainly on the Moral High Ground.
We were chastised in the Seattle Stranger for “Politics with a Sledgehammer,” even though we never once used a literal reference to Bush/Chaney/Rumsfeld. Now, 11 years later the American Government’s unscrupulous use of torture (ends justifying means) is back in the spotlight.

And our question remains: “Is this the body of Christ?”